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Following Up After an Interview

By Kaitlyn Lannan

March 9, 2015

These days, many interviewers expect a follow-up thank you note after an interview. Some companies have even been known to discard your application, even if you were an otherwise good candidate, simply because you did not follow up with a thank-you after an interview.

Needless to say, it’s an important part of the interview process. Following up can also be important if you are looking for information on the status of your job application.

Here are some of the best follow-up strategies:

WRITE A NOTE

Send a thank-you as soon as possible after the interview. Email or write a personalized note to the interviewer recapping what you discussed in the interview, why you think you would be a good fit, and express your gratitude.

Including what you discussed in the interview will help the recruiter to remember you.

CHECK THE PROCESS

To follow up about the status of your job application, check on the company’s website to see if there is a general careers email address or a phone number for job candidates to call. If you choose to call, make sure that there is not a “no phone calls” policy, or you risk getting your application immediately rejected if you break the rule.

If you have the contact information of the person who interviewed you, it could also be a good idea to contact them to see if they know where you are in the application process.

SHOW INTEREST

Be persistent, but not annoying. The tricky part with following up with companies after an interview is to show them that you are interested in the position, but not to annoy them with the amount of times that you contact them.

Try following up twice, any more than that and you will probably not get a positive response.

It can be frustrating to have to follow up with a company that you were hoping to hear from soon after submitting your application or interviewing, but following up and sending thank you notes can keep your name at the top of the pile and get you noticed by recruiters.

Kaitlyn Lannan is a junior at Northwestern University. She is majoring in economics and communication studies and plans on attending business school in the future. Her dream job is becoming the Chief Marketing Officer at a Fortune 500 company. You can find Kaitlyn on Twitter at @KaitlynLannan.

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Have You Considered A Career In Finance?

By Nicole Chacin

March 4, 2015

According to a recent Forbes poll, the primary goal of college undergrads is to major in a discipline that will enable them to be financially well-off. Even so, the number of women studying finance is not the same number as their male counterparts.

In fact, women do not even occupy half of the classroom seats or corporate suites for finance. In 2013, women only make up 11.4% of the Chief Financial Officers of the Fortune 500. Yet inherit in the study of finance and the jobs within this field, are a thorough understanding of how to achieve financial independence and gain skills to make and manage money. So why are more female undergrads not studying finance?

While a management degree will lead to a general overview of business functions and principles, a finance degree is highly concentrated and focused. It provides big picture perspective and broad understanding of how to manage money—whether for individuals, institutions, or organizations. Finance also handles instruments such as stocks and bonds, which change economic markets.

Coursework in finance involves math and statistics as well as business principles. While some might classify finance as more of a technical discipline, it happens to have many client-facing positions for management leaders.

Ruth Porat, who has a bachelor’s in economics from Stanford and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business, has transitioned from advising several clients and managing operations for just a few, to instructing and overseeing the inward operations of thousands during her career at Morgan Stanley.

She has helped companies such as Amazon and Priceline go public, advised the Treasury Department on the takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and oversaw the inward operations of Morgan Stanley’s many employees and affiliates around the world, all while being conscientious of the public image of the company and its finances.

Investment banking and commercial banking businesses all started under a single roof as there was very little regulations until the 1930s, and the banking industry came under scrutiny with new legislation that was passed. These great empires with political and financial clout were originally built by men from exclusive old boy’s clubs; now decades later we have only a few handful of brilliant women who have taken the initiative to add diversity and new leadership in the world of finance in these top leadership positions.

One of the key resources that helped Porat join the ranks of history of these other brilliant female CFOs is her finance degree. Porat has paved the way for the next group of female management leaders.

No one says that a finance major leads to a c-suite office, yet finance does provide a female undergraduate confidence and perspective to explore countless career fields in business that require a blend of technical and practical business understanding which finance provides.

And no one says that a business degree by itself is enough to obtain a reputable position in a company or a high paying salary. Finance provides an economic worldview that is both practical and tangible to the consumer and student who will need to know how to manage their money in light of how the world is managing its money.

To explore exciting career opportunities and network with students and professionals to learn how finance can be a valuable resource for your academic and professional journey, apply to the Fast Track to Finance Conference for undergraduate women, which will be held at Boston’s Federal Reserve Bank on May 1, 2015.

Nicole Chacin is a Chicago native and student at the George Washington University where she studies business administration. Nicole aims to obtain a dual masters degree in Law and Business Administration by 2017 and ultimately dreams of working in health policy and administration.  This is Nicole’s 2nd year writing for Forté as she had the opportunity to learn about the organization through the first Forté C2B Leadership Conference.

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4 Tips to Strengthen Quantitative Skills

January 8, 2015

by Nicole Chacin

When trying to improve quantitative skills, it is important to give yourself varied materials in segments to absorb and learn at a reasonable pace. Cramming learning materials in such a way is much like heavy lifting when your muscles are overworked or out of shape; more often than not it will be very exhausting and may not produce the results desired.

The following 4 tips will address just how students can choose cost-effective resources at their disposal for a strong approach to improve their quantitative skills in business.

Read Business Oriented Materials such as Journals, Articles, and Blogs

Becoming familiar with the language of business is pivotal to being able to advance in your study of business concepts and models. The vocabulary of business is not the typical vernacular you hear every day and requires familiarization.

By reading these materials you will also strengthen qualitative understanding of business such as the climate of the marketplace, the key movers and shakers, and the way policy affects business here and all over the world.

Pick at least one business role model in the industry you want to enter and examine how they became successful.

There is a great deal we can learn from leaders in business in the way they got started and how they advanced in their industry. Great leaders were all students at one point, and it was their decisions at this key time in their life that paved the way for their future successes.

Studying at least one role model is not just good to boost your morale and inspire you, but it will remind you that you are more than capable of achieving all that you intend to if you take the right steps to prepare yourself.

Pick up from the library or purchase a copy of a prep material book in a subject you need work on.

If your background is not business, math, or science it can be difficult to dive into business studies. To help facilitate the transition, a lot of students take time during the summer or during their breaks to brush up on some old math concepts and learn some basic statistical concepts.

I have found that the materials students use to study for AP tests in Math and Statistics are great for preparing for business classes in college. There are a great deal of prep materials for students in college or post college to pick up and peruse. You may even find your campus offers certain discounts to purchase these materials if you ask your career center or business school advisor.

An even more targeted approach would be to pick up the exact textbook from a course you will be taking and get a head start on the material so you have a strong start and not such a steep learning curve to circumvent.

Look online to see videos for certain math concepts performed on paper or in a classroom setting.

There are many websites which students can use to review their calculus, algebra, and geometry concepts with practice problems and detailed solutions. There are certain courses online students can audit or take free of charge to enhance many other quantitative skills.

Community colleges also offer summer enrichment programs for those who prefer a classroom setting in person. In fact, if you want to brush up on a specific mathematical or statistical concept, you can look at the online non-profit, Khan Academy, which has pre-recorded video tutorials for students at no cost to you.

As great as these resources are, a college education and obtaining a degree are the ultimate accreditation you can receive for your hard work as a student.

Quantitative studies can be very exciting when you have a confident approach to tackling them and have good inspiration and guidance along the way. Happy studying!


Nicole Chacin is a Chicago native and student at the George Washington University where she studies business administration. Nicole aims to obtain a dual masters degree in Law and Business Administration by 2017 and ultimately dreams of working in health policy and administration.  This is Nicole’s 2nd year writing for Forté as she had the opportunity to learn about the organization through the first Forté C2B Leadership Conference.

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Networking Your Way Through College

December 10, 2014

by Siobhan Bauer

One of the most rewarding aspects of being a college student is how available people are to be a resource for you. I have been surprised on multiple occasions by the willingness of others to answer my questions, connect me with their colleagues, and share their own career stories.

I have also learned that there are an enumerable amount of opportunities available to you on campus. Whether you are looking for a job, a research position, a volunteer role, or simply just more information about a field that sparks your interest, there are countless people on campus that can help you.

However, with thousands of other students around, it is on you to take the first steps to begin building these connections—a simple email is often all it takes to get the ball rolling. Networking can be a daunting task when you are just starting out, but as a college student, you are in one of the best environments to start making connections and learn how to be an effective networker.

Below are some networking guidelines that I believe will help set anyone in the right direction.

1. Do your homework!

Know who you are emailing. Before you reach out to a professor/advisor/staff member, look them up! If it is a professor, read up on some of the research they have completed. For university staff members, read up on what work their department does, and the role they play in their workplace.

Doing some research will help you be able to articulate in your message why you think they will be able to help you, and ultimately why you are reaching out to them.

2. Have a clear objective.

Why do you want to connect with someone? When you first email someone, make sure you present a clear and concise objective. Always let them know you are a student, and connect your educational and career goals with what they do. Tell them why you think they would be helpful for you to get in touch with, and hopefully, they will be happy to do so.

3. Don’t be afraid of rejection.

It is important to realize is that you have nothing to lose when you start networking – in the sense that reaching out does you no harm and it will not set you back at all.  Don’t be afraid to reach out to a lot of people! Although some people may not email you back, or may not be the kind of resource you were looking for, do not get discouraged!

You may run into an instance when a position isn’t available but even if you don’t qualify right off the bat, they now know your name, know you’re interested and you’ll have a leg up the next time you reach out.

All in all, learning how to network is a powerful tool in both your time as a college student and in preparation for your career in the future. Spending the time to practice those skills while you still in school with help you be ahead of the game when you begin setting up your career.

Networking has played a huge role in my undergraduate career – and the first time I put myself out there and got in contact with someone on campus led me to the job I’ve had for over two years.

During my freshman year, I struggled with my newfound free time, and the large gaps in my daily schedule. In high school, my day was packed morning to night with school and extracurricular activities, so my first year of college was much slower moving.

Unsatisfied with my empty schedule, I took a chance, expecting very little to come of it, and emailed the head baseball coach, expressing my interest in getting a student job in the athletic department. He graciously passed my inquiry along to the appropriate party, and after a couple of more emails and a short interview, I was hired in to do Public Relations and Communications in the athletic department and have been here since.

This job has provided me with many opportunities to network even further, which has led to additional employment opportunities and an even longer list of job experience.

….and all it took was one simple email!

Siobhan Bauer will graduate in 2016 from the University of Washington in Medical Anthropology. Siobhan plans to pursue an MBA with a career in health care or hospital management.

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Breaking Out of Traditional Business Jobs

December 9, 2014

Many students are intrigued by the broad field of business, but aren’t especially attracted to many of the traditional sub-fields, such as banking. Here are jobs in some new areas to consider if this applies to you!

1. Try working at a startup.

Startup culture is relatively new, and many people find that they enjoy working in the fast-paced, collaborative environment that is often offered at companies within the field. Almost any traditional business job can be applied to working at a startup.

For example, this past summer I worked as a marketing intern for an educational technology company, and I was able to do a lot more hands-on work and make more of an impact than I might have been able to at a bigger company. However, be prepared to put in a lot of hard work!

Here are the top 15 startups to work for according to Business Insider.

2. Apply technology to traditional jobs.

If you have an interest in computers and technology in addition to business, you are in luck. In today’s technology-crazed society, employers are always looking for candidates who know how to code and who have a strong knowledge of different computer programs.

Having these skills can really open up your job opportunities, particularly within the IT division of a company or within the digital marketing sector.

3. Put your social media skills to work as a social media strategist for a company.

If you love Facebook and Twitter, why not put your skills to use while getting paid for it? Take coursework in digital marketing and Search Engine Optimization to land a job in this area. Social media is becoming more and more essential to companies hoping to stay relevant, and you can help!

The job market is constantly evolving. By gaining some new skills, particularly within the technology field, you can really broaden the job opportunities available to you. Good luck in your job search!

Kaitlyn Lannan is a junior at Northwestern University. She is majoring in economics and communication studies and plans on attending business school in the future. Her dream job is becoming the Chief Marketing Officer at a Fortune 500 company. You can find Kaitlyn on Twitter at @KaitlynLannan.

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The Changing Culture of Women in the Sports Business

December 4, 2014

by Siobhan Bauer

Professional and collegiate sports make up a sector of business that has been a historically male-dominated culture. In the grand scheme, few women hold executive business roles in the sports world. However, this trend seems to be changing.

Athletics is a great venue to watch how the culture of women in business is transforming, and how there is positive momentum growing for the expansion of women in sports business roles.

I have noticed this growing change through working in both professional and collegiate sports. I have seen that within the larger umbrella of the sports business, there are visible differences between different levels of athletics – specifically these professional and collegiate levels. Through my experience in both of these environments, I have noticed that the business side of college sports is much more progressive than in professional organizations.

The ratio of men to women in this sphere of business is largely driven but the fact that the culture of sports has generally catered to men. But the college athletic business is unique because men’s and women’s sports are governed by the same body. Athletic departments at universities are working to promote sports of both genders, where you find that there are many more women in leading roles in the athletic departments of educational institutions.

At a university, it is not uncommon to see women in athletic director roles, associate positions, in operations management, as sports writers, or as medical staff. When I began working in professional sports, I noticed that the ubiquity of female employees was absent. I was not necessarily surprised, but it was definitely shocking to experience such a stark dichotomy first hand. 

It was really my first work experience where I often found myself being the only woman in the office. But I realized quickly that I could learn a lot from working in a male-dominated workplace.

Being in this kind of environment, I found that I more readily sought a female role model, and that I actively reached out to other women in the office.

Because there were so many more women in the collegiate offices, I had taken women in upper positions for granted. When I moved over to the big leagues, the value of women in executive roles became so apparent to me, and I truly recognized the importance of talking and connecting with the women in these positions.

There are many examples that the culture of sports is changing and it is creating promising evidence that the business of sports will also change. One aspect of sports culture that is transforming rapidly is the demographic of viewers. Women are starting to make up a much greater percentage of fans, and I believe that this is one reality that will begin to have a large impact on the growth of women in the field.

More notably, there are a growing number of women in executive roles. Lesa France is the CEO of the body that manages all NASCAR race tracks. Sue Falsone was the head Athletic Trainer for the LA Dodgers, and the first and only head trainer in any of the major American sports leagues. Kim Ng is the Senior Vice President for Baseball Operations in the MLB, and Jeanie Buss is the President of the Los Angeles Lakers. In 2012, Shannon Eastin became the first female football referee.

This list denotes only some of the influential women who have begun to challenge the norm of this male-dominated field. It is old-fashioned to think that sports is still a man’s world and I think it is only a matter of time before people will no longer be surprised to women in leadership roles.

Photo Source: Daily News

Siobhan Bauer will graduate in 2016 from the University of Washington in Medical Anthropology. Siobhan plans to pursue an MBA with a career in health care or hospital management.

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3 Leadership Styles (and When to Use Them)

November 25, 2014

by Valeria Tirado

When people think of a leader, they tend to think of someone who gives orders and expects his subordinates to follow them; at least, that’s what I thought until I took a college class recently. Little did I know that leadership is not universal, but rather contextual. Below are three particular leadership styles and the kinds of situations that they are best suited for.

1. The first type of leader is the transactional leader.

This style focuses on supervision and organization. They also make decisions themselves and promote compliance of their followers with rewards/punishment. This type of leader was very common a few decades ago, and although it’s been becoming less common nowadays, there are still some situations that would best benefit from a transactional leader.

In the case of a manager, a transactional leadership style is very effective during a crisis since they’ll know how to keep order and give good directions. In general, tasks that require specific tasks to be done are best directed by a transactional leader.

2. The second type of leader is a participative leader, or democratic leadership style.

This leader makes the final decision herself, but asks for the input of those involved along the way. This is a great way to build trust between a leader and their followers since asking for their opinion makes them feel like their opinions matter (which they should) and helps them accept changes better. The biggest example is our own country.

This style is particularly useful when the decision being made affects everyone or when new ideas are needed since you can ask for everyone’s opinion. It is not useful, however, when you need to make a decision fast since all team members may not come to an agreement quickly.

3. The last type of leader is the transformational leader.

This is a fairly new type of leadership style and one that I think a lot of people are trying to adopt today.

A transformational leader differs from a participative leader in that they not only want to hear their followers’ opinions, but they also want to encourage and motivate them. This style depends on high communication and cooperation from both the leader and followers.

This style is good to use in most situations, especially when you want to build strong relationships, but the leader must have proficiency and the followers must be willing to learn.

It’s important to be aware of the different leadership styles there are and to not limit yourself to using just one, since it all depends on the situation. This information will definitely be useful to me and I hope it is to you too when you’re trying to be a leader yourself!

Valeria Tirado is a junior at Rutgers University – New Brunswick with a major in Environmental and Business Economics and an Anthropology minor. She plans to get a Master’s from Rutgers in Food and Business Economics and attend NYU Stern for Economics after graduation. Valeria is the captain of her intramural volleyball team and can be found on Twitter at @valeriat94.

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Networking Can Start Right From Your Classroom

November 18, 2014

by Valeria Tirado

Friends are a vital part of surviving college and making connections are vital in life. So when I say that making friends with connections in college can make your life several magnitudes easier, know that I’m not overselling things.

Sure, they won’t make taking tests any easier on their own necessarily, but they can provide you with the resources you need to do that all on your own. Even better, they can help you when it really counts: after graduation day.

To me, networking is the process of forging relationships with people that are mutually beneficial in the long run. What better place to start networking than your own classroom? If you’ve been able to get to a stage in a relationship with anyone in your class, be it professor or peer, where you’ve exchanged contact information, congratulations! You’ve just networked.

You’ve forged a relationship that could, at some point, be beneficial to one or both of you. It’s that easy, and it’s an opportunity that only a fool would waste.

“But how do I network?” you ask. It might seem like a daunting task but it’s really not that hard. Like I said, you can even start right from your own classroom!

First, find someone who you wish to network with. It can be anyone, but people with something to offer you, whether it is experience or information is preferred.

Next, you approach the person and strike up a conversation.

Finally, you request that person’s contact information or give them yours and voila, you’ve officially networked as well as any person can. Now, so long as you keep in touch with that person every so often to keep the contact information up to date, you’ve used networking to gain a permanent person to request help from for life!

Those steps aren’t the only paths to proper networking. In fact, there isn’t any path to proper networking. When you’re forced to split into groups in class and give out your information, you’re networking. On the first day of class when you exchange info with your professor, you’re networking. When you’re at a party and you get the number of a cute boy with the tattoo that you know your parents will just hate (but really isn’t that why he’s so attractive in the first place?), you are networking.

So long as that contact info stays up-to-date, you’ve networked successfully and can reap the rewards.

What are those rewards, you ask? Well, flash forward ten years and you need a job. You remember your professor mentioning that he worked in a similar field and he writes recommendations all the time.

Oh, and there’s that girl you were in a group with once who’s working in the same field now. Maybe she knows the best places to apply.

There was that boy with the tattoo you met a party too; well wouldn’t you know he’s the CEO of a major company in the field you’re applying to.

Isn’t it such a small world?

Valeria Tirado is a junior at Rutgers University – New Brunswick with a major in Environmental and Business Economics and an Anthropology minor. She plans to get a Master’s from Rutgers in Food and Business Economics and attend NYU Stern for Economics after graduation. Valeria is the captain of her intramural volleyball team and can be found on Twitter at @valeriat94.

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